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Fe y Alegría International Federation attends the World Assembly for Education in Nepal

Fe y Alegría International Federation attends the World Assembly for Education in Nepal

  • Posted: Nov 15, 2018 -
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During this week, November 13-18, the 6th World Assembly of the Global Campaign for Education (GCE) is being held in Kathmandu, Nepal. In this conference, GCE members and partners from all four corners of the world gather to discuss crucial and emerging issues regarding education.

The Global Campaign for Education is the world’s largest civil society organisation working to make the right to quality education a reality for all. The World Assembly, held every four years, is the governing body of the Global Campaign for Education, which brings together members of the GCE organisation to reflect over the achievements of the organization, share the knowledge gained during the previous period, discuss current and emerging issues in global education and participate in shared strategic planning for the next four years.

Lucía Rodríguez Donate from Fe y Alegría International Federation and Luis Carlos Soler, representative of the Red Generación 21+, are currently in Nepal. The World Assembly is one of the largest international gatherings of campaigners in the education sector. 

The theme of the 6th World Assembly is “Transforming education systems to achieve equality, inclusion and justice”. The topic reflects the fundamental belief of the Global Campaign for Education that education is a human right, and that quality education for all is achievable if both governments and the international community have the necessary political will to engage and invest in education policies. It also defines the central strategic areas of focus for the Organisation in the upcoming years.

There will be three main moments:

November 13TH: FRESCE Global Learning Event
It will bring together all national and regional members who are currently funded by the FRESCE program and who often do not have the opportunity to work together in the regions, only about every three or four years, therefore, it is a great chance to discuss in depth, share challenges and successes and to learn from each other.

You can follow the event through the hashtag #EduLearning2018; #EducationResearch #AdvocacyResearch

November 14TH-15TH: Pre-World Assembly Youth Meeting
This year is the very first time that the Global Campaign for Education will organize this event. During two days, young education campaigners from all over the world are invited to discuss and debate the main issues related to the education sector today. In addition, representatives will be invited to present their policy recommendations to be discussed and adopted by the World Assembly.  You can follow the event through the hashtag #gceyouthcaucus2018

November 16TH, 17TH, 18TH: World Assembly
It will have three highlights: a one-day policy forum for a high-level debate on the future of education, a reflection on the impact of GCE and on how to move forward to achieve the targets of SDG 4 that will result in the new GCE strategic plan and policy r, and the election of the Board and the new GCE president.
You can follow all about the Assembly on the Facebook and Twitter accounts from the Global Campaign for Education Spain or through the hashtag #GCEWorldAssembly2018.

Calling for change through a renewed vision and a “holy anger”: Father General’s address to GIAN and social apostolate coordinators

Calling for change through a renewed vision and a “holy anger”: Father General’s address to GIAN and social apostolate coordinators

  • Posted: May 22, 2018 -
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In a meeting for discernment and apostolic planning, Father General Arturo Sosa SJ reminded leaders of the Global Ignatian Advocacy Networks (GIAN) and Social Apostolate Coordinators who met in Rome from 23 to 27 April 2018 of the need for “a renewed vision of the deep link between social justice, care for the environment, the struggle for peace and faith.  All this, together, moves people to work for reconciliation among themselves, with creation and God.”  And to bring about change, “we need a kind of passion, a ‘holy anger’… a passion that cries ‘enough.’”

“The GIAN groups are our effort to be a catalyst for this change. I ask you to find the passion and the mission that can re-energise these structures… I know that unless we are focused, specific and targeted, our advocacy will not work well.”

And with preparations underway for the Special Assembly of the Synod of Bishops of the Pan-Amazon region that will take place in the Vatican in October 2019, Father General sees this effort by Pope Francis as “a concrete way to help move the Church to implement Laudato Si’” and “also a call to the Society of Jesus to focus on reconciliation with creation as a dimension of the mission we have received.”

The Society of Jesus is currently undertaking a discernment process of their Universal Apostolic Preferences (UAP) that involves a discernment in common, using the GC 36 decrees as a background, Father General’s letter that launched the discernment process, and the initial chapters of the book Shaping our Future.

Ecojesuit shares below a slightly revised version of Father General’s address during the meeting in Rome:

This is a meeting for discernment and apostolic planning and discernment in common means to hear together the Holy Spirit and to make decisions according to the inspiration we feel together.  It is possible only if we gain interior freedom as individuals, as a group, as an apostolic sector of the Society.  It is a conditio sine qua non for this or any group to liberate itself from a sectorial vision of the Society’s mission.  GC 36 is asking this group and the entire apostolic body of the Society to acquire the look of the Holy Trinity.  We are called to look at history with their eyes and find out how we, as a universal apostolic body, can do our best (magis) to make a contribution to the redemption of human beings.  It is also important to remember that discernment in common is a prior condition for apostolic planning.

The next challenging step is apostolic planning.  Both words are important.  The first one is apostolic that means that what we do is not a product of our minds, but a call we receive to be sent to collaborate in the missio Dei.  We are an apostolic body, i.e., a group of people “sent” to be part of a mission.  Therefore, we are not the owners of the mission.  We are followers – disciples of Jesus sent to be witnesses of His Good News.

Planning involves taking seriously this condition of apostolic body.  We are administrators of somebody else’s resources and we are committed to do that work in the best possible way.  We are a group responsible for the call to participate in the reconciliation of all things in Christ.  And so we try hard to do our best.  Following this mission has become, for each one of us and for this group, the deepest sense of why we do what we do.

After the UAP are formulated will come the process of planning how a complex apostolic body like the Society of Jesus can be oriented in the next 10 years.  Provinces, Conferences of Major Superiors, apostolic areas and apostolic works have their own plans.  How can the UAP help the Society in its apostolic planning at all levels to be more focused?  How can the UAP lead us to a better use of our limited resources?

GC 36 confirms and focuses the mission of faith and justice, dialogue and interculturality that inspired our commitment for more than 50 years, since the Second Vatican Council and from GC 32 up to GC 35.  This confirmation means a renewed vision of the deep link between social justice, care for the environment, the struggle for peace and faith.  All this, together, moves people to work for reconciliation among themselves, with creation, and with God.

It is a confirmation of a deep current, of a deep way forward for us, in a world that is at a new moment in history and has become quite different from the world during the post-Vatican II years.  Here is a very important challenge for the apostolic body of the Society of Jesus and for the social dimension of its apostolate: to come to know, understand and share with others what is happening in human history and to find effective ways to help to move it to the reconciliation and justice shown in the Gospel.a

“We come together to form a body of Jesuits and partners in mission organized in such a way that collaboration is a characteristic of the entire apostolic body. Our action is also in collaboration with others within the Church or with those persons and groups struggling for social justice, with peacemakers and with those working for the preservation of the environment.”

“We come together to form a body of Jesuits and partners in mission organized in such a way that collaboration is a characteristic of the entire apostolic body. Our action is also in collaboration with others within the Church or with those persons and groups struggling for social justice, with peacemakers and with those working for the preservation of the environment.”

Getting out of poverty, the possibility to access quality education, participation in making political decisions democratically: these remain unrealised wishes for the great majority of human beings.  How can we, as a universal apostolic body, improve our commitment to help these desires to be accomplished?  How can we face the ambiguous process of human mobility in the actual world where there are new ways of interaction among individuals and peoples oriented to a more integrated humanity, side by side with people fleeing from war or poverty?  How we can combat the trafficking of human beings and new forms of slavery?

Many other questions about our mission of reconciliation and justice can come from what is going on in the world today.  The GC 36 puts before us a very special one:

GC36 asks Father General to continue to work with Major Superiors and Conferences to promote, within the communities and ministries of the Society, a consistent culture of protection and safety for minors, in keeping with the suggestions of the Congregation regarding formation, community life, ministries and governance.

The promotion of a consistent culture of safeguarding involves the transformation of unjust existing structures and a deep change in every culture.  It also a matter of promoting the human rights of vulnerable people.  And so, I have decided that the implementation of this project be entrusted to the Secretary for Social Justice and Ecology.

Pope Francis has convoked a special Synod in 2019 on Amazonia.  It is a concrete way to help move the Church to implement Laudato Si’.  Maybe is also a call to the Society of Jesus to focus on reconciliation with creation as a dimension of the mission we have received.  It is very clear that Pope Francis is thinking not only about a specific geographical area of the world, but that he also wants to move us to more concrete apostolic actions regarding the care of our common home.  How can we introduce this matter in our discernment in common and apostolic planning?

An important accent put by GC 36 is that we are collaborators with God’s action in history today and we are called to become companions in a mission of reconciliation and justice.  To become companions means that we see ourselves as collaborators.  We come together to form a body of Jesuits and partners in mission organized in such a way that collaboration is a characteristic of the entire apostolic body. Our action is also in collaboration with others within the Church or with those persons and groups struggling for social justice, with peacemakers and with those working for the preservation of the environment.

Globalisation today brings us together across the globe and makes networking easier.  Of course it has also widened the gap between rich and poor so it is not totally a blessing – in fact there are many problems.  But, without doubt, it gives us the ability to be a universal body for mission and our Jesuit networks have opportunities now that 10 years ago did not exist.

Since we are largely organized on province lines, the existence of interprovincial networks can be a challenge.  GIAN, as a relatively new project, is experiencing some of the pains of being an interprovincial network in a largely provincial Jesuit structure.  The issues that GIAN addresses are vital ones:

  • Migration
  • Ecology – care of our Common House
  • Governance of mineral and natural resources
  • The right to quality education
  • Peace and Human Rights

Through Laudato Si’, Pope Francis “also wants to move us to more concrete apostolic actions regarding the care of our common home. How can we introduce this matter in our discernment in common and apostolic planning?”

Through Laudato Si’, Pope Francis “also wants to move us to more concrete apostolic actions regarding the care of our common home. How can we introduce this matter in our discernment in common and apostolic planning?”

These are words on a page.  But they represent so much human suffering.  Think of the wars in Syria and in Kivu, in Afghanistan and Iraq.  Think of the millions on the move, searching for a better life because the world’s political and economic system has failed them totally.  Think of the children without education who have to work from a young age.  Think of people exploited in mines so that people in boardrooms and stock markets can make big profits.

To bring change, we need a kind of passion, a “holy anger” if I can put it that way.  We need a passion that cries “enough.”  We need a passion that mobilises people of faith and all people of goodwill to work together for change.  Because the Gospel is about change, about liberation.

The GIAN networks are our effort to be a catalyst for this change.  I ask you to find the passion and the mission that can re-energise these structures.  I ask you to identify, very specifically, the changes you want in each of these areas and then to map out how to get there with an outline of resources needed and a time frame (which for sure will have to be flexible).  Advocacy is not an easy task and the Society needs to improve the ways we do it.

I know that unless we are focused, specific and targeted, our advocacy will not work well.  The Social Justice and Ecology office here exists precisely to help with such strategizing and help the GIAN groups to find that focus, that passion, that energy, that direction.

I see here people at this table who have great experience in all these areas.  Please use that expertise to bring people to freedom.  Use it to fight for justice.  Pope Paul VI said: ‘if you want peace work for justice’.  We do want peace.  Peace is a Gospel promise, a beatitude “Blessed are the peacemakers”, a fruit of the Resurrection.  And so, our mission for the service of faith and the promotion of Justice is foundational, moving us beyond any ideology to a service of Christ carrying His cross and laboring for the peace that the world cannot give.

Thank you again for your presence here. It inspires me in my work. It gives me the consolation and the energy to tackle the issues that face me here every day.

The Society has a great mission and you, both lay people and Jesuits, are part of trying to take it forward and renew it as you discern, pray and work together so that the frontiers of unbelief and of poverty, of discrimination and injustice can be pushed back and so that people can find true liberation and reconciliation based on the Gospel promise and on the person of the Risen Christ.

Thank you and I wish every blessing for your meeting here and an enjoyable and fruitful time in Rome.

Arturo Sosa SJ

International Literacy Day: little to celebrate

International Literacy Day: little to celebrate

  • Posted: Sep 08, 2016 -
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Fifty years ago, UNESCO officially proclaimed 8 September International Literacy Day to actively mobilize the international community and to promote literacy as an instrument to empower individuals, communities and societies.

Now International Literacy Day is celebrated worldwide, bringing together governments, multi- and bilateral organizations, NGOs, private sectors, communities, teachers, learners and experts in the field. On this day also International Literacy Prizes are awarded to people with outstanding solutions that can drive literacy towards achieving the 2030 Education Agenda. This year the focus is on innovation.

This is the first year of implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. In this context the vision of literacy is aligned with lifelong learning opportunities with special focus on youth and adults. Literacy is a part of Sustainable Development Goal 4, which aims to “ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all”. The target is that by 2030 all youth and a substantial proportion of adults, both men and women, achieve literacy and numeracy (SDG Target 4.6).

The International Literacy Day will be celebrated all around the world. The main global celebration of the day will take place at UNESCO Headquarters, Paris in the form of a two-day conference on 8 – 9 September, the highlight of which will be the awarding of the Literacy Prizes. At the same time the Global Alliance for Literacy (GAL) will be launched, a new and ambitious initiative to make all major stakeholders pull together to promote literacy as a foundation for lifelong learning.

In addition, the Incheon Declaration , signed by more than 150 education ministers and representatives of civil society in May 2015 step during the World Education Forum has a specific commitment to promoting adult learning opportunities :

IncheonDeclaration

Check out the information (in English ) on the various ups and downs of adult literacy showing the following infographic and points out that, despite numerous international agreements since 1960, there is little to celebrate as more than 758 million people are still illiterate in the world and this represents 15 % of the world population .

ild-2016-infographic (1)

Collaborating with the academia: GIANs and the University

Collaborating with the academia: GIANs and the University

  • Posted: Dec 04, 2015 -
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As a finishing touch to the “Networking for Justice” meeting that took place in Loyola from the 16 to the 20 of November and in which 60 people from different continents, Jesuits and laypeople and people from various sectors of the Society of Jesus, including the four Global Igantian Advocacy Networks that work in migrations, the right to a quality education for all, ecology and governance of natural and mineral resources participated, the last ones participated as well in a Round table at the Comillas University in Madrid, Spain, last Monday the 23 of November.

The Round table was entitled “Global challenges, networking responses” and was chaired by the Rector of the University, Julio L. Martínez and Marta Muñiz, Head of ICADE Business School.  Some leaders of the GIAN networks intervened in the colloquium: Benny Juliawan, leader of the Migrations network, Lucía Rodríguez and Augustin Kalubi, leader and member of the network for the right to education respectively, Julie Edwars, leader of the network for the governance of natural and mineral resources and Daniel Villanueva, the director of the Spanish NGO Entreculturas.  

The meeting was an opportunity to share some lessons learned from the networking that has been carried out at a global level by the Society of Jesus since 2008, in areas such as ecology, migrations, natural resources or education.

Lucía Rodríguez started off by stressing the need of this new way of organization to deal with the repercussions of globalisation for the most vulnerable. She also highlighted the strengths of the Society of Jesus when it comes to networking as it has been an international apostolic body since its creation. She also explained how this new working procedure demands a new organisational culture in which it is essential to constantly search for synergies and resources, dialogue, a shared leadership and high motivation, generosity and dedication.

The speakers shared concrete networking experiences: in the Migrations network, they presented a vision of a possible legislative strategy that would have to take into account the diversity of migratory flows in the world, the awareness campaign of the Governance of Natural Resources network with Alboan about the extractive industry and the use of minerals in electronic devices, or the monitoring and participation of the network for the Right to Education in the international education agenda towards 2030.
The Round table finished with the words of Daniel Villanueva in the hopes that the meeting would open channels of collaboration with the academy and with the motivation that the ground covered by the networks up until now together with the internal cultural change that the Society is experiencing will be useful to work together and horizontally for global justice and the most vulnerable people in the world.  

Pope Francis stands for education in the margins: refugee children and youth

Pope Francis stands for education in the margins: refugee children and youth

  • Posted: Nov 13, 2015 -
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On Saturday, 14 November at 12pm, 15 refugees, as well as staff and friends of the Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS), will attend a private audience with Pope Francis. The Pope will speak about the importance of education for refugee children and youth as a means to build peace and foster the development of more resilient and cohesive societies. The event will commemorate the 35th anniversary of JRS, founded by the former Superior General of the Society of Jesus, Pedro Arrupe SJ.

Pope Francis has long urged Catholics to welcome refugees, saying the world is currently suffering from a “globalisation of indifference,” ignoring those who cry out for mercy. On Saturday, as a precursor to the Holy Year of Mercy to launch on 8 December, the Pope will formally recognise and pledge support for the JRS Global Education Initiative, an initiative aimed to extend JRS’ educational programmes to 100,000 additional refugees by the year 2020.

Refugees face a variety of barriers trying to access education, from overcrowding in schools to xenophobia in host communities. Their fundamental right to education is often lost. Among refugee children, only 36% globally go to secondary school and less than 1% have the opportunity to pursue a higher education.

car01_2015_xx08_lshea_Bangui_0177

Children in Bangui, Central African Republic continue to learn despite the conflict around them. Access to education can keep children safe and protected from risks, including gender-based violence, recruitment into armed groups, child labor and early marriage. (Laura Sheahen)

 

For 35 years, JRS has provided quality education as a tool for people to better fulfill their own potential and fully contribute to the growth, strength and stability of their communities. Schools allow those who have been forced to flee their homes to rebuild a shared space, a community, a sense of normality. Pope Francis has historically called the public to protect refugees and care for the most vulnerable. Access to education can keep children safe and protected from risks, including gender-based violence, recruitment into armed groups, child labor and early marriage.

The Jesuit Refugee Service programmes are found in 45 countries, providing assistance to: refugees in camps and cities, individuals displaced within their own countries, asylum seekers in cities, and to those held in detention centres. The main areas of work are in the field of education, emergency assistance, healthcare, livelihood activities and social services.

At the end of 2014, JRS employed approximately 1,400 staff: lay, Jesuits and other religious to meet the education, health, social and other needs of nearly 760,000 refugees and IDPs, more than half of whom are women. Services are provided to refugees regardless of race, ethnic origin or religious beliefs.

Jesuit Refugee Service

Jesuit educational institutions demand State responsability for Guatemalan students

Jesuit educational institutions demand State responsability for Guatemalan students

Coinciding with the general elections that took place last weekend in Guatemala and that have concluded with the election of Jimmy Morales as President of the country, a large pool of Jesuit educational institutions have  presented EJEGUA, a proposal for educational priorities that the new President will have to take into account in order to guarantee a public educational system that lives up to the Guatemalan population.  

This advocacy initiative is mainly driven by the Rafael Landívar University -URL-, the Loyola school, the Javier Lyceum, the Educational foundation Fe y Alegría, the Guatemalan Institute of radiophonic education -IGER- and the labour educational Project Puente Belice. Currently, these institutions offer training at all educational levels for more than 100.000 boys, girls, young people and adults distributed all over the country. From high school to university level, and in different modalities of formal education, formal and non-formal extracurricular education and technical professional training. Thus, they believe that the current circumstances that the country is going through represent an opportunity to become an inter-institutional group that contributes to the analysis and the proposal to improve the educational situation in Guatemala, as nowadays it presents serious problems that especially affect vulnerable groups.

This document proposes the reduction of the educational desertion and the extensive coverage, “strengthening the general scholarship programs and the scholarships for the accelerated formal education or second chance education for young poor people that abandoned the educational system, can open a window of opportunity for them.” They alert about the high percentage of young people that don’t study nor work (25,1% or around 800.000 youngsters according to the INE) and propose the strengthening  of the comprehensive technical training and the generator of decent employment opportunities by the State. Moreover, they propose the improvement of the educational quality from the learning methods and subjects, including fundamental competences for life using learning contexts that encourage their development as active citizens that are engaged with the social and environmental surroundings in which they live. They also highlight the importance of endowing the educational system of quality, with well trained and well-paid educators and from the relevant and adapted education centres.

While other countries already exceeded the 6%, Guatemala only destined the 3.2% of their GDP for education in 2015, therefore, in the document they urge to increase social investment improving the fundraising and reducing corruption, to create alliances with other state and autonomous institutions that could support education. Lastly and as a revindication against the short termism of the public policies, they think that the educational priorities and the budget allocation for this policy can’t suffer any electioneering alterations and should be established as a priority for the State of Guatemala.  

News item extracted from complete article here (in Spanish)

Accessing to education makes a great difference for youngsters

Accessing to education makes a great difference for youngsters

  • Posted: Oct 28, 2015 -
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I am Alba, coming from +18 group in Murcia delegation (Spain). I bring with me the knowledge of different cultures from Latinamerica and Central America but also with mind opening. I have seen or thought about concepts that I had in mind from a very differetn perspective; I beilieve education is very important because it will encourage and possiblitate you to make decisions, which are fundamental in your every day life. From the moment you wake up till you go to bed you are making decsions so it is essential that we demand and fight for quality education. As youngsters, we must mobilize to get quality education for all, because union makes the strenght and if we all youngsters want quality education, at last, we will make it for all.
Alba Campos, 45th Fe y Alegría International Conference participant

 

The experience of this Conference has helped me empathise with other realities, different countries; it has helped me to not stay still facing though realitiesand it has given me strenght to keep fighting and supporting from here, from Spain, to try to demand a solution for the problems we face, we have. Without education, a person is very limited; they have many barriers, and accessing to education a person can be free, can have critical thinking, and can act towards this world. I believe that youngsters must articulate and find achievable proposals for future generations to overcome the barriers we have faced due to our education.
Carlos, 45th Fe y Alegría International Conference participant
60 youngsters from Fe y Alegría Latin America and Africa meet to speak about education

60 youngsters from Fe y Alegría Latin America and Africa meet to speak about education

  • Posted: Oct 26, 2015 -
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The 45th edition of the Fe y Alegría International Conference has taken place from the 16th to the 19th of October under the motto “Youth Culture, Citizenship and Peace” in the city of Barranquilla, Colombia.

This is a yearly gathering for the 21 national Fe y Alegría representatives currently present around the world. In its 45th edition, more then 60 youngsters between the ages of 16 and 22 years old attended the conference as representatives of every country where the International Federation is present; Nicaragua, Colombia, Italy, Spain, Haiti and Chad among others.

The goal of this encounter was to dialogue about what it means to be a young woman and a young man today: who they are, what they are doing, what are their challenges, what are the demands of their social contexts and how they can contribute to generate proactive participation and a culture of peace in their places of origin and the world.

According to the last United Nations report on “the State of the World Population”, there are about 1.800 million youngsters in our planet. This means that today more than 25% of the world population is aged between 10 and 24 years old. 

Adolescence is a very special stage for the development of one’s full potential to live a life with dignity and encourage responsible participation in public life. Fe y Alegría is clear and speaks about “youth” from an inclusive, rights and gender-based perspective as an acknowledgment of the diversity of people and realities, since there is a great complexity and differences among young people today depending on the social, cultural, political and economic contexts in which they live.

Acknowledging the importance of this group of people, the International Federation Fe y Alegría agreed to address the 2015 Conference to youth in order to listen to their reflections, wishes and challenges in their path towards personal development.

The new Federative agenda to be developed in the next years will arise from these contributions and, therefore, be the guidelines to follow in the work with youth from the different countries that make up this movement.

You can take a look at the Conference sessions and updates on the site http://movimientos.feyalegria.org/ and through the hashtag #FeyAlegriaCulturasJuveniles

and the Youth Manifest just published today (in Spanish).

I vote for education, and you?

I vote for education, and you?

  • Posted: Apr 20, 2015 -
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The Global Campaign for Education (GCE) is an international colation made up of NGOs, teacher’ unions and other civil society movements commited to education. It was established in 1999 and delivered a united civil society voice during the World Education Forum in Dakar in 2000, influencing the six Education for All goals. Since then GCE has continued to grow and some important progress has been made, including 40 million more children in school. However, far more still needs to be done to realise the right to quality education for all. Close to a billion people right now are being denied the education that would change their lives. 

GCE campaigns throughout the year, mobilising pressure from all sectors and holding governments and international institutions to account.

During this week and under the slogan “I vote for education, and you?” the GCE is campaigning to encourage new international commitments towards 2030 through the Education World Action Week in more than 120 countries in the world.

2015 is a crucial year for granting education because there are several international appointments that will deal with this topic and will set the new horizon to work on; in September 2015, the international community that will meet at the United Nations Assembly, will review the Millennium Development Goals adopted in 2000 and will take on the new Sustainable Development Goals. This review will highlight that in education matters, although there have been some important progress; there are challenges we need to face urgently. For example, the fact that, still today, there are 58 million girls and boys who have no access to schooling and there are 775 million adult people, two thirds of them who are women are illiterate.
The United Nations Assembly of September 2015 is an extremely significant date, because the new global development agenda for the next 15 years will be set. As it can inferred from the My World 2015 survey, from United Nations, there is a huge calling from the citizens of all over the world to make education the backbone of the new development Agenda. The appointment of September can become a great chance for the international community to demand the effective accountability of the right to education for everyone.
But just any kind of education will not work. The kind of educations we should stand for is an universal one, for everyone. This quality education must provide people not only with knowledge and basic skills, but also with fundamental attitudes and values to get through life. It must be an equitable education, that places excluded groups of, boys and girls, young groups and collectives in the first place: impoverished families, young girls, and ethnic minorities, those who live in countries facing armed conflicts, in refugee status, displaced o migrations, with particular educative needs, among others. It must be an inclusive education, that respects and adapts to children and young groups needs and that it embraces and values diversity, considering it an important strength. It is an education that includes lifelong learning and it has a social transformation willingness promoting global citizenship.

In Spain, under the slogan “I vote for education, and you?” , the coalition lead by several NGOs like Entreculturas, and ALBOAN, Jesuit NGOs for cooperation development, are organizing 29 mobilisation events in more than 25 cities where there will be more than 7.000 students, activists, teachers, political representatives and 170 educative centers.

In its website www.cme-espana.org/yovotoporlaeducacion they are runing different actions to support education such as taking a picture with #yovotoporlaeducacion, participate in educative games likehan puesto en marcha diferentes propuestas que van desde hacerse una foto con el #yovotoporlaeducacion, a participar en juegos educativos como el “Twister of education” or representing “United Nations Assemblies“. The aim is to add on as much people as possible to this project which is showing support to a quality education for everyone. The main demand is that the Spanish Government commits into building both agendas, looking out for education to be one central goal and it is placed in the centre. Spain must increase its Official Development Assistance contribution for education, reaching at least what it has been asked in the Cooperation Comission of the Spanish Deputies Congress of assigning 8% of the total billateral ODA to basic education.